First Few Days in the U.K. by Tom Callanan

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After settling in and getting acclimated to the local pub environments here in Belfast, our third day began with a tour of the Titanic Museum.  My favorite part of the museum was the shipyard which had an outline of the ship’s size engraved into the pavement.  It was an extremely cool experience to be able see in person the sheer footage of the Titanic.  After Trevor and I walked the Titanic, we boIMG_0201.JPGarded a ship called the Nomadic which was 106 years old.  The tour guide informed us that the S.S. Nomadic served as a tender to Titanic and her sister Olympic, delivering passengers and luggage to the larger ocean liners that were too big to dock at the harbors.  We also learned that during the first World War, she was sent to Brest to be used as a troopship for the U.S. 7th infantry division for nearly 2 years. After the war, she traveled all around the world tendering for ocean liners until 1977, where she opened as a floating restaurant on the River Seine in Paris.  In 2006, she returned to Belfast and was restored to her former glory, and she has remained there ever since as a tourist attraction.  The thing that stood out to me most was she still has most of her original features, and I got to stand where some of the most famous people in the world had stood just 100 years earlier, such as the world’s richest man (at the time), the first female nobel prize winner (Marie Curie), Hollywood legends past and present (Charlie Chaplain), and the actor in the original Tarzan movie, who also happened to be an Olympic medal winner (Johnny Weismuller)

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Timeline of Nomadic

Nomadic’s Famous Passengers

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